The Dangers of Texting and Driving

Some say that driving while texting is worse than driving drunk. In fact, studies show that 97.5% of people cannot drive safely while using cell phones.

When you send a text message, you have to focus on the message you are typing, taking not only your arm off the wheel but your eyes off the road as well. There are some people who master typing text messages without having to look at the phone but this still poses an even greater danger than making a call because the coordination required in typing these messages with your finger affects how the one hand on your steering wheel focuses on driving. Simply put, texting forces you to keep your mind off driving – something that you do not want to do on the road.

Needless to say, the trend caused the rise of these car accidents occurring on various US highways and byways, which compelled their respective legislators to do something about them. Once again, the solution is a ban on the use of cell phones in sending text messages while driving. This, however, does not change the fact that motorists can still make calls on their hands free set on the road.

Texting While Driving Laws

A few years back when almost everybody started getting a cell phone and putting their lives, work and time into them, the US legislators slowly started promulgating bans on the use of cell phones while driving. Early on, one of the first laws against cell phone use while driving was the prohibition of making phone calls while driving, for the obvious reason that it keeps one of the motorist’s hands busy when both of them should be on the wheel – a scenario that caused a lot of car accidents.

Later, the laws were changed a bit and they finally allowed users to make calls on the cell phones while on the road so long as these calls were made through a hands free set. Unfortunately, this did not ultimately solve the risk of mobile phone-related car accidents. When the text messaging feature of cell phones became popular, people started using their phones mainly with text messaging, which caused even more trouble.

Now, at the time of this article, 30 states, including DC and Guam ban text messaging while driving. Within the next few years, more and more states will enact laws banning “texting” and driving. Please view the chart at ghsa.org to view mobile phone restrictions while driving in your state. Chances are, there is some type of law against mobile phone use while driving in your state!

Not only is texting while driving against the law, it’s also very dangerous and it is a fast growing cause of many traffic accidents in the United States. From 2001 to 2007, around 16,000 people died from cell phone related traffic accidents. Authorities claim that increases in texting volumes have resulted in thousands of additional road fatalities in the United States.

Alternatives To Texting While Driving

As they say, it’s better to be safe than sorry. To prevent yourself from becoming a statistic in this unfortunate trend, you should strongly consider limiting cell phone use while driving. It would be most wise to completely stop using your cell phone behind the wheel; but in this age of technology, often times that is not possible. Below are some alternatives to texting and driving. You probably don’t need to text and much as you think you do!

Voice Recognition Software

There are many cell phones that come with voice recognition software so you can safely send text messages while driving without trying to look at that tiny cell phone screen!

Text Blocking Applications

Some new generation phones like the iPhone and the Droid have apps that will determine if you are in a moving vehicle. If you are, texts won’t be delivered until your vehicle comes to a stop.

Auto-responders

You can program your cellphone to send a response at any time you are not able to text back a reply. While driving, simply set up an auto responder saying “busy driving.. I’ll text you later”. Chances are your friends won’t even realize that it was an automated response!

Just Turn It Off

You can’t receive messages when your phone is off, right? I know this isn’t ideal, but it is the simplest and cheapest way to do things. When you turn your phone back on, all messages sent to you during the time your phone was off will be received.

Just Say No

The fact remains – you are much more accident prone while you are behind the wheel using a cell phone. Texting while driving can increase your insurance premiums in many ways. If you get a ticket while driving, this stain will go on your record and you will most likely end up paying more for your insurance rates. If, god forbid, you are involved in an accident while texting, you will be at fault.

Everyone should keep in mind that there is a very obvious yet serious reason why law makers are banning these kinds of practices with cellular phones – it’s plainly dangerous. By not refraining from this irresponsible method of driving, you not only put yourself in danger, but you put those other motorists, pedestrians and the very people riding in the car with you in danger as well.

Be a responsible driver: don’t drive and text at the same time. As mentioned before – it’s better to be safe than sorry. Practice safe driving and avoid cell phone use behind the wheel… you’ll be happy you did!

Feedback

  Comments: 1


  1. Text messaging is by far the most missused and worst technological form of communication ever invented and should be banned. In just a few short years, I have personally witnessed hundreds of people texting while driving.

    A few of the worst – not paying attention to the road, rear ending others, losing control, panic stopping and causing others to rear end them, swaying all over the road, leaving 10-20 car lengths infront of them in traffic, causing accidents of every kind, etc and so on.

Responses to Vin

Click here to cancel reply.