How to Get Points Removed from Your License

Most states use a points-based system to regulate drivers. Certain violations are worth a certain number of points. If you collect too many points in a span, then you could face fines or license suspension.

In some states, you can simply pay a small fine to have points removed from your license. In other states, points are automatically removed after three to five years.

Having points on your license can lead to higher insurance premiums. Having too many points on your license can lead to the loss of your driver’s license. You may even be denied employment because of your poor driving record.

Fortunately, every state allows you to remove points from your license. Driver’s license points are never permanent. Some states deduct points for attending traffic school, for example. Other states force you to wait four or five years.

Today, we’re explaining how to get points removed from your license in every state.

How to Get Points Removed from Your Driver's License

How Long Do Points Stay on Your Record?

First, let’s make one thing clear. In most states, points technically stay on your record permanently unless expunged by a court order.

However, these points should only impact you for two to six years, depending on the severity of your violation.

A DUI you received twenty years ago will not impact your insurance premiums today, but a speeding ticket you received last month will affect insurance premiums.

Rules vary widely between states. Read our state-by-state breakdown below.

Get to Remove Points from your License in Every State

Alabama

Alabama does not currently have a point reduction program. Points remain on your record permanently. However, two years after a traffic conviction, the point count for that conviction will no longer count for suspension purposes.

Alaska

Alaska drivers are eligible for the Alaska Point Reduction program. You attend and complete an approved defensive driving course, then get two negative points removed from your license. Any driver in Alaska can take a defensive driving course for point reduction once every 12 months. After completing the course, the course provider will notify the DMV of your completion, and two points will be removed from your driver’s license record.

Arizona

Arizona does not have a point reduction program. Points are added to your permanent driving record if you are convicted of a moving traffic violation. However, if you have received a traffic ticket but have not yet been convicted, then you may be able to take a defensive driving course and avoid having the points added to your license altogether.

Arkansas

Arkansas does not have a point reduction program. All points added to your driver’s license remain viewable by insurance companies for three years. Employers can view driver’s license points for a longer period of time. Points from more severe convictions stay on your record for a longer period of time.

California

California does not have a point reduction program. Points remain on your driver’s license for 3 years, although certain severe violations can stay on your license for longer. If you have received a violation but have not yet been convicted, then you may be able to attend traffic school and have the points “masked” from insurance companies, although you can only do this once every 18 months.

Colorado

Colorado does not have a point reduction system. However, if your license is suspended due to an excessive number of points on your record, then you may be able to reduce the length of the suspension if you provide the Hearing Officer with evidence that you have changed your bad driving habits.

Connecticut

Connecticut does not have a point reduction system. Points remain on your driver’s license for two years from the date they were assessed.

Delaware

You can receive a three-point credit in Delaware by taking a defensive driving course. This credit is applied to a driver’s point total after completing an approved defensive driving course, and the credit remains valid for three years, after which the credit is removed. You can take another defensive driving refresher course to maintain the three-point credit.

District of Columbia

Drivers in Washington, D.C. may be able to take an approved online defensive driving course to remove points from their record. However, you must receive prior approval from a DC DMV Hearing Examiner.

Florida

Florida has no point reduction system for drivers. However, if you have received a violation but have not yet been convicted, then you may attend a driver improvement school to avoid having points added to your driving record for a particular violation.

Points stay on your record in Florida for three years. Depending on the accumulation of points, you could face further suspensions:

  • 12 months earned within 12 months leads to a 30-day suspension
  • 18 points earned within 18 months leads to a 3-month suspension
  • 24 points earned within 36 points leads to a 12-month suspension

Typically, minor incidents in Florida – like a speeding ticket – are worth around three points. More serious incidents – like a DUI – are worth 6 or more points.

Georgia

Drivers in Georgia can send a request to the Department of Driver Services (DDS) to reduce the number of points assessed against their driving record. You can remove a maximum of seven points once every five years. To receive a point reduction, you must successfully complete an approved driver improvement course, then present your certificate of completion to the Georgia DDS. Points stay on your record in Georgia for two years.

Hawaii

Drivers in Hawaii no longer receive points for traffic violations. However, convictions are still recorded to the driver’s traffic abstract, and multiple convictions on your record can lead to fines or loss of license.

Idaho

Drivers in Idaho can request to reduce their point total by three points every three years by completing an approved defensive driving course. You can avoid an impending driver’s license suspension for point accumulation by taking an approved defensive driving course, although the course must be completed prior to the date on which your suspension takes effect.

Illinois

Illinois has no point reduction system. Points remain on your driver’s license for four to five years, depending on the severity of the violation.

Indiana

Drivers in Indiana can take a Driver Safety Program course to receive a four-point credit on their driving record. This credit can be applied every three years. You can take an additional course within the three year time period to extend the credit. The credit will be extended three years from the date on which you took the additional course.

Iowa

Iowa has no point reduction program. Points remain on your driver’s license for 12 months.

Kansas

Kansas’s DMV does not use a point system to track traffic violations. However, the DMV does keep a record of past convictions on your driving record. Multiple and/or serious violations can lead to license suspension or fines. There’s no way to remove these convictions from your record (aside from waiting for them to disappear over time).

Kentucky

Kentucky has no point reduction system for drivers. Points remain on your driving record for two years from the date of conviction, although the conviction entry itself remains on your record for five years. If you have received a violation but have not yet been convicted, then you may be able to take a driving course to avoid having points added to your record, although you’ll need a referral from the District Court in the jurisdiction where the violation occurred. You can take a defensive driving course for this purpose once every 12 months.

Louisiana

Louisiana’s OMV has no point system to track violations, although it does have a record of past convictions. Serious and/or multiple violations can lead to the suspension of your license.

Maine

Drivers in Maine can complete a Driving Dynamics course to get a three-point credit applied to their driving record. This course can be taken once per year to renew the credit.

Maryland

Maryland’s Motor Vehicle Administration automatically removes (or ‘expunges’) all points and violations from your driving record three years after your conviction, assuming you have no other incidents (moving violations, criminal offenses, or other incidents) within that period of time. If you have been convicted of another violation within that period of time, then you can request a manual expungement of your record at the MVA website here.

Massachusetts

Massachusetts has no point reduction program. Points from traffic violations remain on your record for six years from the date they were received, and insurance companies can view these points (and use them to influence insurance premiums) for six years.

Michigan

Michigan has no point reduction system, and points remain on your driving record for two years from the date of conviction. Drivers in Michigan who have received a violation but have not yet been convicted may be able to attend a defensive driving course to have points hidden from insurance companies. However, you’ll need to receive a notice from the Michigan Secretary of State.

Points assessed by the Michigan Department of State stay on your driving record for two years – even for more serious convictions like a DUI. However, two DUI convictions within a seven-year period can lead to permanent license suspension.

Minnesota

Minnesota’s DVS has no point system for traffic violations, although they do keep a record of past convictions for each driver. If you have multiple and/or serious violations within a certain period of time, it can lead to higher insurance premiums or even license suspension.

Mississippi

Mississippi’s DPS has no point system for tracking traffic violations. However, the DPS does maintain a record of past convictions for each driver. If you have multiple and/or serious convictions within a certain period of time, it can lead to license suspension.

Missouri

Missouri has no point reduction system for drivers. However, the Missouri DPS will automatically reduce the number of points on your driving record for every year you drive without a new conviction. Your points are reduced by one third for your first clean year, half for your second clean year, and to zero for your third clean year.

Montana

Montana has no point reduction program. Points from traffic violations remain on your driving record for three years from the date of conviction. Points are removed from your driving record automatically after three years and will no longer affect insurance rates. However, the conviction remains on your driving record permanently. Furthermore, convictions for your second DUI (or any subsequent DUIs) within five years will impact insurance premiums and could potentially lead to license suspension.

Nebraska

Nebraska has no point reduction program. Points remain on your license for five years before being removed.

Nevada

Drivers in Nevada can take a driver training course to receive a three-point credit on their driving record. However, you cannot take this course if you have traffic violations pending, nor can you take it if you have more than 12 points on your driving record.

New Hampshire

Drivers in New Hampshire who have accumulated three or more points on their driving record can take a ‘Driver Improvement’ course to have three points removed from their record. Courses must be taken in-person. If you do not take the Driver Improvement course, the traffic violation remains on your record for three years.

New Jersey

Drivers in New Jersey can take a defensive driving course once every five years to reduce their point total by two points.

New Mexico

New Mexico has no point reduction program. If your license is suspended due to excessive point accumulation, then you may be able to take a defensive driving course to renew your license.

New York

Drivers in New York can reduce their point total by four points once every 18 months by completing an approved defensive driving course. Point reduction only applies to violations that occurred within the last 18 months, and points for earlier violations cannot be removed. Point reduction cannot be used as credit towards future violation points, and your point total cannot be reduced below zero. You are not eligible for point reduction if your license has already been revoked or suspended. Furthermore, point reduction will not cancel or prevent license suspension for violations like DWI, DWAI, or three or more speeding violations within 18 months.

North Carolina

Drivers in North Carolina with more than seven points on their driving record may be told to take a Driver Improvement Clinic by a judge or hearing officer. If you successfully complete the Driver Improvement Clinic, three points will be removed from your driving record. Not all drivers qualify for this point credit, and you need to speak with a hearing officer to confirm point removal.

North Dakota

Drivers in North Dakota can remove three points from their driving record once every 12 months by taking a defensive driving course. You cannot receive credit for future violations: you can only reduce points that are already on your driving record.

Ohio

Drivers in Ohio with two to twelve points on their driving record may be able to take a defensive driving course to get a two-point credit. Completing the course does not remove existing points on your driving record, although it can negate the impact of future traffic convictions.

Oklahoma

Drivers in Oklahoma can take a defensive driving course to get a two-point credit on their driving record. Courses can be taken once every 24 months. Your points are also automatically reduced by two if the driver goes 12 consecutive months without receiving a traffic conviction. If you go three consecutive years with no convictions, then the points on your record will be reduced to zero.

Oregon

Oregon’s DMV does not use a point system to track traffic violations, although the DMV does maintain a record of past convictions on your driving history. Drivers with multiple and/or serious convictions may have their licenses revoked or suspended.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has no point removal system for drivers. However, three points will be removed from your driving record for each 12 consecutive months without a violation. After your driving record is reduced to zero and remains at zero for 12 consecutive months, any further accumulation of points will be treated as your first accumulation of points. In other words, your record is completely expunged after 24 consecutive months without a violation.

Rhode Island

Rhode Island’s DMV has no point system for tracking traffic violations. However, the DMV does maintain a record of past convictions on your driving history. If you have multiple and/or serious convictions on your record, it could lead to higher insurance premiums and license suspension.

South Carolina

Drivers in South Carolina can take a defensive driving course to reduce their point total by four points. The course must be taken in-person and takes eight hours. You can take the course and reduce your pints by four once every three years.

South Dakota

South Dakota’s DPS has no point reduction program. However, the DPS tracks violations, and drivers with multiple and/or serious violations within a short period of time may face higher insurance premiums or license suspension.

Tennessee

Tennessee has no point reduction program. Drivers who accumulate 12 or more points within a 12 month period will receive a notice of proposed suspension. At this point, the driver can attend an administrative hearing. At this hearing, you should be given the opportunity to take a defensive driving course to avoid your suspension (or reduce the length of your suspension). Drivers with more serious violations, however, may not be given this opportunity.

Texas

Texas has no point reduction program. However, the Texas DMV tracks convictions, and drivers with multiple convictions in a certain period of time may face license suspension or higher insurance premiums.

Utah

Drivers in Utah can remove 50 points from their driving record by completing a Defensive Driving course. The course can be taken once every three years. Drivers can also improve their driving record over time by maintaining a clean record. After one full year without a traffic violation, the points on your record will be reduced by half. After two years without a conviction, points will be removed entirely.

Vermont

Vermont’s DMV has no point reduction program. Drivers who accumulate 10 points or more within a two year period will have their license suspended.

Virginia

Drivers in Virginia can attend a DMV-approved defensive driver course once every 24 months to add safe driving point credits to their record.

Washington

Washington’s DOL has no point system for tracking traffic violations, although the DOL does maintain a list of prior convictions. If you have multiple and/or serious convictions within a certain period of time, your license may be suspended.

West Virginia

Drivers in West Virginia can attend a DMV-approved defensive driving course once every 12 months to remove three points from their driving record. It must be an in-person course, and credit only applies to points already on the driving record (there’s no credit towards future convictions).

Wisconsin

Drivers in Wisconsin can reduce their point total by three by completing an approved traffic safety course. You can take this course and reduce your points once every three years.

Wyoming

Wyoming’s DOT has no point system for tracking traffic violations, but the DOT does maintain a record of past convictions. Drivers with multiple and/or serious convictions on their record in a short period of time may face higher insurance premiums and license suspension.

Feedback

  Comments: 15


  1. I got a ticket for disobeying a traffic light. I have a commercial license. I was in my personal vehicle. I tried to fight the ticket and was found guilty. I got 3 points on my license. How can I get my points removed from my commercial license?

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      Since you were found guilty, your best bet would be to enroll in a driver safety course. Check with your local DMV office or browse online to see what courses are available. Successfully completing the driver safety course should remove those 3 points from your license, just make sure to obey all traffic laws in the future. Sometimes trying to make that light before it turns red can be very costly, as you could either be pulled over and given a ticket, or you could also be involved in an accident.


  2. Can I appeal to get 2 points taken of my license? I need it in order to get a job.

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      You can try to appeal your 2 points, although it’s best to plan for appeals to not work. Traffic violation appeals can be successful, but oftentimes they aren’t. However, it’s certainly worth trying to appeal it if you think you have a legitimate basis for an appeal. The authorities won’t just overturn the points because you want to, so you need some type of reason.
      In addition to an appeal, you can also enroll in a driver safety course. This should completely wipe those 2 points off, so this might be your better option anyways.

  3. Peter E Kentebe


    I have more than 3 points on my license. I am eligible to attend traffic but never attended. It’s over a year now. Can now still attend traffic school? And how do I go about being allowed to attend traffic school

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      You can enroll in a driver safety course at any time, even if you don’t have any points on your record. In addition, if you’ve practiced good driving in the last year, then you should see a 3 point reduction in your total number. But yes, you can still take a driver safety course to drop it even further. You can either look online for local driver safety courses, which are sometimes called defensive driver courses, or you can visit your local DMV to get information on how to enroll.


  4. Point taken


  5. How can I take off 2 points of my driver license or what can I do?

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      Your best option to get 2 points off your record is to enroll in a driver safety course. This will remove those points from your record and also will teach you how to best avoid getting any further points in the future. Check with your state’s DMV to find out more information on how to enroll in one of these courses.
      If you think the 2 points were in error, then you can also try to appeal your 2 points. However, this isn’t guaranteed to work, so your fastest option would be to take the driver safety course.

  6. Richard Dunbar


    Can I get points off a CDL? Got 2
    Points for DWL cause dot med. Wasn’t in DMV computer, but had a valid card with me. Next 1 point for backing into a light pole on private property.

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      Your best bet would be to enroll in a driver safety course. Check with your local DMV office or browse online to see what courses are available. Successfully completing the driver safety course should remove those 3 points from your license.
      It also sounds like you might be able to appeal the 2 points based on your documentation. You’ll need to show the authorities your doctor-approved medication, and likely a doctor’s note saying that you are allowed to drive while taking those meds, but an appeal should work if you can get that documentation.


  7. I got pulled over for going 20mph over the posted speed limit, it gave me 6 points on my license. I was in my personal vehicle when it happened. I have my CDL and these points have been an absolute pain in the butt. I took the Defensive Driving Course recently for $80 and got 3 points off thinking it would make it a little easier to get a job. I was wrong, I wish there was a way to get the other 3 off and not have to wait 12 months before I’m able to take the Course again.. I’m sick of struggling and not being able to get a job!

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      Hi Shane,
      I’m sorry to hear about your struggles. Speeding tickets can definitely be a game-changer when it comes to CDLs and finding or keeping a driving job. It’s good that you took a defensive driver course and got the 3 points taken off, but yes, unfortunately, you will have to wait another 12 months to take it again. In the meantime, you will just have to try and keep your head up and keep looking for a job. Demand for truck drivers is huge right now, so there might be some companies that would hire you with just the 3 points. Keep trying!


  8. I got points on my license when I was in NJ Which have caused my insurance rates to skyrocket to roughly $250 a month. I’ve since moved to California and now have a Cali ID. How do I go about reducing points to lower my rates? Do I take a point reduction course for NJ, or Cali?

    • Andrew@4AutoInsuranceQuote


      Hi Tyler,
      You would take the course in California, since that’s where your license is now. It can take time to lower your rates, so you’ll have to be patient. It’s good that your taking a defensive driving course, because that can have a good size impact on your rates, but you won’t see that until your next renewal. Make sure the insurance company knows that you successfully completed the course. After that, you’ll just want to practice safe driving habits, and eventually it will fall off. You can take a course once a year, which will also help speed it up. You could also consider buying an older, cheaper car for now, which would also lower your rates.

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