What is Full Glass Coverage?

Auto glass insurance coverage, or full glass coverage, is an optional policy offered by many auto insurance companies. Full glass policies cover your vehicle's windshield, windows, and other glass by repairing or replacing your damaged glass. Insurers may include glass repair insurance coverage in your comprehensive policy, which costs an average of $159.72 per year or $13.31 per month.

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Rachel Bodine graduated from college with a BA in English. She has since worked as a Feature Writer in the insurance industry and gained a deep knowledge of state and countrywide insurance laws and rates. Her research and writing focus on helping readers understand their insurance coverage and how to find savings. Her expert advice on insurance has been featured on sites like PhotoEnforced, All...

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Leslie Kasperowicz holds a BA in Social Sciences from the University of Winnipeg. She spent several years as a Farmers Insurance CSR, gaining a solid understanding of insurance products including home, life, auto, and commercial and working directly with insurance customers to understand their needs. She has since used that knowledge in her more than ten years as a writer, largely in the insurance...

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Reviewed by Leslie Kasperowicz
Former Farmers Insurance CSR

UPDATED: Oct 30, 2020

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What You Should Know

  • Full glass coverage repairs or replaces glass in your car, from windshields to windows
  • Full glass coverage is not always automatically included in your auto insurance policy, which means drivers will have to pay extra to add full glass coverage
  • If full glass coverage is included, it will be a part of your comprehensive coverage

What is full glass coverage? Full glass coverage is an optional policy offered by many car insurance companies that covers damages to car windshields and windows. Today, we’re explaining everything you need to know about full glass coverage to help you with understanding auto insurance. Read on to learn all about auto full glass coverage, how it works, and whether or not you should get it.

To start shopping for the best rates on car insurance with glass coverage in your area, enter your ZIP code in our free tool above.

Auto Glass Repair Insurance Coverage

Will my insurance pay for a cracked windshield? What does full glass coverage mean? If you have auto glass insurance coverage, also known as full glass coverage, it will cover damage to your vehicle’s windshield, windows, and other glass. This optional car insurance policy will pay for the cost to repair or replace your damaged glass.

Sometimes, full glass coverage comes with no auto glass deductible. What part of auto insurance covers windshields if there is no deductible? In most cases, full glass coverage comes with the usual comprehensive coverage deductible – say, around $250 to $500.

Some car insurance companies include full glass coverage in comprehensive coverage auto insurance policies. Typically, comprehensive coverage windshield policies vary from state to state. A state with harsher winters, for example, may not offer full glass coverage because there’s more gravel on the road and a higher likelihood of windshields being shattered, so you will have to buy auto insurance with glass coverage insurance.

According to the Insurance Information Institute (III), comprehensive insurance costs an average of $159.72, so if you have to purchase glass coverage separately expect additional costs added to your comprehensive policy.

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Do I have full glass insurance coverage?

Does full coverage insurance cover glass repairs? You might already have car glass coverage on your auto insurance policy. If you just have basic liability insurance, then windshield and other glass damage will not be covered.

If you have liability and collision coverage, then it’s also unlikely that you’ll have auto glass coverage or windshield coverage. Most collision coverage insurance policies do not cover any type of glass damage outside of an accident.

If you have comprehensive coverage, however, then it’s possible that you have full glass coverage. In fact, some state auto insurance requirements require insurance companies to include full glass coverage as part of all comprehensive insurance plans.

So if you were searching for full glass coverage with Geico or full glass coverage with Progressive, the better question may be what are my state’s full glass coverage laws. Once you know that, you can find a provider with the best rates.

View the table below to see the full glass coverage laws in your state.

Full Glass Coverage Laws by State
Full Glass Coverage Laws by StateReplacement LawRepair lawZero Deductible with Comprehensive Coverage
AlabamaParts must be like kind and quality and restore vehicle to value before lossNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
AlaskaNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
ArizonaAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorYes - optional
ArkansasAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
CaliforniaAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
ColoradoNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
ConnecticutAftermarket and used parts allowed with written noticeConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteYes - optional
DelawareAftermarket and used parts allowed with written notice; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
FloridaParts must be of same quality, fit and performanceNo specifications in law found.Yes - state law waives deductible for windshields only
GeorgiaAftermarket and used parts allowed with written notice and guarantee; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
HawaiiNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IdahoAftermarket crash and used parts allowed with written notice; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IllinoisAftermarket and used parts allowed with written notice in estimate; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IndianaConsumer choice of OEM, aftermarket or used if vehicle less than 5 years oldNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
IowaAftermarket crash parts (specifically excluding windshields) may be used if they are “at least equal in kind and quality … in terms of fit, quality and performance, or that the part complies with federal safety standards”, if mentioned in the policy; consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
KansasInsurance company chooses if using aftermarket parts that are of like kind and qualityInsurance company may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
KentuckyAftermarket and used parts allowed, consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteYes - state law waives deductible for auto glass
LouisianaNon-OEM aftermarket crash parts allowed with written noticeMax comprehensive deductible is $250Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MaineAftermarket and used parts allowed, consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MarylandAftermarket parts of like kind and quality and used parts allowed unless insured had waiver purchased for OEM parts prior to lossConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MassachusettsOEM parts for 2004 and newer vehicles with less than 20,000 miles and 15,000 miles for 2003 and older vehiclesNo specifications in law found.Yes - optional with no deductible or $100 deductible
MichiganAftermarket parts may be requested by insurance company, but must be identified on written estimateConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MinnesotaInsurers may choose aftermarket parts for windshields and used OEM parts for all other repairsConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteYes - optional; insurance companies required to offer policy
MississippiInsurers may choose aftermarket parts, and aftermarket crash parts may be used if noted on estimateConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MissouriAftermarket parts may be used, if stated on the estimate, and the parts are “at least equal in like, kind and quality in terms of fit, quality and performance”Insurer may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
MontanaNo specifications in law found.Consumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
NebraskaNo specifications in law found.Insurer may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
NevadaNo specifications in law found.Consumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New HampshireAftermarket parts of like kind and quality and used parts allowed unless cosumer has two year old or newer vehicle with less than 30,000 miles and requests OEM partsConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New JerseyNo specifications in law found.Standard comprehensive deductible is $750Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New MexicoInsurers may choose aftermarket parts if like kind and qualityNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
New YorkAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, form, finish, quality, and performanceNo specifications in law found.Y - optional
North CarolinaAftermarket parts allowed with written notice and at least equal in terms of fit, quality, performance, and warrantyConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
North DakotaInsurers may choose aftermarket parts if comparable to OEMNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
OhioAftermarket parts allowed, consumer may refuse but pays difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
OklahomaAftermarket parts allowedInsurer may choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
OregonInsurers may use aftermarket crash parts if it is at least the same quality with respect to fit, finish, function and corrosion resistanceConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
PennsylvaniaNo specifications in law found.Consumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
Rhode IslandAftermarket parts at least equal in kind and quality may be used unless car is 30 months old or less; then consumer must be notified in writing and gives consentNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
South CarolinaNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Y - state law waives deductible for auto glass
South DakotaAftermarket crash parts allowed with written notice in estimateConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
TennesseeNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
TexasAftermarket and used parts of like kind and quality allowedConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
UtahAftermarket crash parts allowed with disclosureConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
VermontAftermarket and used parts of like kind and quality allowedConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
VirginiaAftermarket parts allowed if they are at least equal in like kind and quality in terms of fit, quality and performance and a statement appears on the estimateNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
WashingtonAftermarket and used parts of like kind and quality allowed; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendorNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
West VirginiaFor cars younger than 3 years, insurers must use OEM parts unless consumer waives in writingNo specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
WisconsinAftermarket and used parts allowed; consumer may refuse but pays the difference in quoteConsumer has right to choose repair vendor but may have to pay difference in quoteNot a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
WyomingNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
Washington DCNo specifications in law found.No specifications in law found.Not a law - Individual insurance companies may offer with comprehensive coverage.
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Nevertheless, it’s possible to have comprehensive insurance without full glass coverage auto insurance. Just because you have comprehensive insurance does not guarantee that you have glass coverage. Many insurance companies offer an optional “rider” specifically for glass damage.

It’s also important to check your specific glass coverage: some glass coverage policies cover only windshield damage, while other policies cover windshield and glass damage.

Should I buy auto glass insurance coverage?

If you don’t already have full safety glass coverage, then it may be a good idea to get it from auto glass insurance companies. Typically, full glass coverage will cost you about $5 to $10 more per month for auto insurance, or anywhere from $60 to $150 per year. In exchange, you get full coverage for any windshield or glass damage and repairs.

The first step in deciding whether or not to buy glass coverage is to check how much it costs. Ask your insurance company how much it costs to add full glass coverage to your policy. This might be labeled as a “glass rider” by your insurance company.

Next, consider the chances of your windshield being cracked or damaged. If you park on the street or outdoors, for example, your windshield has a significantly higher chance of being damaged – say, by falling branches, a neighborhood street hockey game, or vandalism.

Cities that use gravel on their roads in the winter may also have higher incidents of broken windshields. Some drivers also choose to get full glass coverage if they live on a gravel road or if they frequently drive off-road and have a higher risk of needing windshield replacement.

The next important thing to consider is your deductible. With most full glass coverage policies, you’ll need to pay your comprehensive coverage deductible. How high of a deductible should I get with my auto insurance policy? Typically, this deductible should be less than your ordinary liability insurance deductible. It might be around $250, for example, or even less. Some glass repairs are so cheap that they won’t even exceed your deductible. In this case, it’s better off not having full glass coverage.

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When Auto Glass Insurance Deductibles are Waived

Auto insurance companies don’t expect you to pay a $250 deductible to repair a $50 crack in your windshield. Fortunately, some auto insurance companies will waive your glass deductible in certain situations.

If you’re replacing a small crack or chip before it turns into a bigger problem, for example, then an auto insurance company might cover the repairs while waiving the deductible.

Geico windshield coverage, for example, will waive the deductible for windshield chip repair at Geico if you have a chip or crack on your windshield smaller than a dollar bill.

Ultimately, fixing a windshield may not be as expensive as you think. Mobile windshield repair stations can be found in parking lots. These stations can fix a crack or chip in your windshield while you wait. Auto repair shops can give you a fast and cheap quote on windshield repairs.

Nevertheless, it may be in your best interest to purchase full glass coverage insurance on your vehicle. It gives you added peace of mind for a few extra dollars per month.

We hope that our guide answered your question of does auto insurance cover glass damage. To find the best rates on window insurance for a car, enter your ZIP code in our free tool below.

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