Do Seatbelt Violations Affect Insurance Rates?

Were you caught driving without a seatbelt? You may be worried about the impact on your car insurance premiums.

Will car insurance rates go up after something minor like a seatbelt violation? Or will you continue paying the same rates? Let’s take a closer look at what you can expect after receiving a seatbelt ticket.

Do Seatbelt Violations Affect Insurance Rates?

Getting a Single Ticket Can Raise Car Insurance Premiums from 15% to 30%

If you are a driver with a clean record, then getting a single ticket can cause car insurance premiums to rise substantially.

However, not all tickets are treated equally. A ticket for reckless driving, for example, will raise car insurance premiums more than any other ticket. ‘Reckless driving’ is defined as “operating an automobile in a dangerous manner under the circumstances, including speeding…and other careless and dangerous driving behavior.”

DUI violations can also cause car insurance premiums to rise substantially. You can expect car insurance rates to rise by about 20% after a DUI citation.

Driving without a license and careless driving are also tickets that can cause car insurance rates to rise 15% to 20% or more.

Meanwhile, a seatbelt violation is unlikely to have a significant effect on insurance premiums. Seatbelt violations cause, on average, a 3% rise in insurance premiums. Some drivers will pay the exact same rates after a seatbelt violation.

How Different Tickets Affect Car Insurance Premiums

As reported by Forbes, here’s how different types of tickets affect insurance rates, including the amount your premium can be expected to increase after a single ticket:

  • Reckless Driving: 22 percent
  • DUI (First Offense): 19 percent
  • Driving Without a License or Permit: 18 percent
  • Careless Driving: 16 percent
  • Speeding (30 mph Over the Speed Limit): 15 percent
  • Failure to Stop: 15 percent
  • Improper Turn: 14 percent
  • Improper Passing: 14 percent
  • Following Too Close/Tailgating: 13 percent
  • Speeding (15 to 29 mph Over the Speed Limit): 12 percent
  • Speeding (1 to 14 mph Over the Speed Limit): 11 percent
  • Failure to Yield: 9 percent
  • Driving Without Car Insurance: 6 percent
  • Seatbelt Tickets: 3 percent

As you can see, if you’re going to get a ticket, then a seatbelt violation is the right ticket to get. Drivers across America, on average, will see insurance premiums rise just 3% after a seatbelt violation.

For the average driver, that means you’re paying about $50 more per year for car insurance after a single seatbelt violation.

Stats vary widely depending on which source you’re using and which state you’re in. In some states, your first DUI or DWI will cause insurance rates to rise around 80%, on average. Reckless driving and highway racing will cause insurance premiums to spike 73% and 71%, respectively. Seatbelt violations, however, rarely cause premiums to rise more than 5%.

When Will My Insurance Premiums Rise?

Typically, insurance premiums won’t rise immediately after you receive your seatbelt violation.

Instead, you can expect insurance premiums to rise when your policy is up for renewal. That’s when the car insurance company reviews your driving record and adjusts premium pricing.

How Long Does a Seatbelt Ticket Affect Insurance Rates?

Generally, any ticket is going to affect your insurance premiums for a minimum of three years.

Some insurance companies go back up to five or seven years, particularly for more serious violations. In California, for example, insurance companies aren’t allowed to offer good driver discounts until at least 10 years have passed since your last DUI.

A seatbelt violation, however, shouldn’t affect your record for more than 2 to 3 years. After seven years, your seatbelt violation won’t even show up when the insurance company pulls your record from the DMV.

What About Out of State Seatbelt Violations?

If you were driving out of state and were caught without a seatbelt, then you’re not going to escape punishment.

Most states have reciprocal agreements allowing them to automatically share driver data. 45 states and Washington DC have signed something called the Driver’s License Compact to share driver information across borders. The five states that have not signed the agreement – Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, Tennessee, and Wisconsin – still share and receive information just like the other states.

No matter where you received your seatbelt violation in America, your seatbelt violation will follow you across state lines.

Conclusion: Compare Quotes to Find the Right Insurance Provider

Some insurance companies treat seatbelt violations seriously. Your rates might rise 5% to 10% after a single seatbelt violation, for example.

If your car insurance premiums have spiked after a seatbelt violation or another type of citation, then consider shopping around for a new car insurance provider. You’re generally free to cancel your car insurance at any time and switch to a new provider. Take advantage of this to jump between companies and save money on insurance premiums after your seatbelt violation.

Of course, other insurance companies don’t treat seatbelt violations seriously at all, and your rates might remain completely unchanged after a seatbelt violation. On average, you can expect car insurance rates to rise 3% after a seatbelt violation.

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